A British family created the chocolate bar in 1847

Fry's Chocolate Cream

As Fry's Chocolate Cream they baptized this tablet whose center is filled with simple fondant covered with chocolate. For decades it would occupy the first place of preference in Great Britain.

The chocolate bar as we know it today was an invention of a British chocolate family, owner of the Fry and Sons company, which launched this new way of eating chocolate on the market in 1847.

For at least a couple of centuries, after the discovery of the cocoa fruit in the American continent, in Europe chocolate was known as an almost exclusive ingredient to be consumed in drink.

It was not until the middle of the XNUMXth century that the Dutch chocolatier Conrad van Houten, in his attempt to make a chocolate powder To drink in a lighter cup, discover how to extract almost all the cocoa butter from the ground seeds, a by-product with which the British chocolate family Fry manages to create the chocolate bar as we know it today.

This cocoa butter, when added to a normal paste of cocoa beans and sugar, achieves a fatty and melting matrix for the dry particles, thus obtaining a less earthy mixture with a good flavor.

Thus, the English firm Fry and Sons transforms chocolate from a drink to a snack that can be taken wherever you want in 1847 and which it mass-produced in 1866 under the name of Fry's Chocolate Cream.

The original Fry's Chocolate Cream chocolate bar consists of a simple fondant center covered in chocolate. Variants include creme de menthe, orange, raspberry, and strawberry.

Cadbury, from competitor to partner of Fry and Sons

The 1919, Cadbury, an English chocolatier owned by brothers John and Benjamin Cadbury, which in 1849 began to produce its own chocolate bar, merged with the company Fry and Sons.

Cadbury was the first English chocolatier to mass-produce a milk chocolate bar, the Dairy Milk, achieving great success and thus surpassing, in 1910, the sales of Fry and Sons for the first time.

Sixty years after the partnership between Fry and Sons and Cadbury, the first chocolatier no longer uses her name; and 20 years later, in 2011, both companies become the property of the United States-based multinational Mondelez International.

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